NO LEGAL RAMIFICATIONS FOR ANTI-GAY HOUSING DISCRIMINATION IN 28 STATES

While 28 States Provide No Non-Discrimination Housing Laws To Protect LGBT Members, GayRealEstate.com Is Dedicated to Matching Members of the LGBTQ Community With Gay, Lesbian and Gay Friendly Realtors Offering Free Buyers Representation.

While there are no federal laws which specifically address housing discrimination against LGBT individuals, GayRealEstate.com, a service connecting clients with compatible agents, remains committed to the mission of finding safe, welcoming homes for LGBT individuals

In United States housing law, only 21 states prohibit discrimination based on sexual orientation and gender identity and one additional state prohibits discrimination based on sexual orientation only, leaving 28 states with no protection against housing discrimination based on sexual orientation and/or gender identity, according to the Human Rights Campaign.

California, Colorado, Connecticut, Delaware, District of Columbia, Hawaii, Illinois, Iowa, Maine, Maryland, Massachusetts, Minnesota, Nevada, New Hampshire, New Jersey, New Mexico, New York, Oregon, Rhode Island, Utah, Vermont and Washington prohibit discrimination based on sexual orientation and gender identity, according to the Human Rights Campaign. Wisconsin prohibits discrimination based on sexual orientation only. The remaining states have no explicit laws which protect housing discrimination against LGBT individuals.

Some cities within the states without legal protections in housing have provided legal protections. Here’s a look at the Top 50 Cities across America:GRE-Infographic-TopUSCities-01 (2)

  1. New York, NY: New York City is subject to not only the New York State Human Rights Law but also the New York City State Human Rights Law; both prohibit housing and lending discrimination based on several protected characteristics. Included in these protected characteristics are sexual orientation and/or gender identity, passed in 2002 and 2015 respectively.    New York also has dedicated resources for service/support to LGBTQ youth, homeless, and elders, people living with HIV/AIDS, and the transgender community.
  2. Los Angeles, CA: Los Angeles is subject to California State law which passed legislation that prohibits housing discrimination based on sexual orientation in 1999 and/or gender identity in 2004.  The City of Los Angeles is also strongly committed to affordable housing that is nondiscriminatory, fully accessible, and in full compliance with fair housing and disability rights laws.
  3. Chicago, IL: In 2005, Illinois passed legislation protecting LGBTQ individuals from discrimination against sexual orientation and/or gender identity.  The City of Chicago has enacted two powerful anti-discrimination ordinances.  The Chicago Human Rights Ordinance prohibits discrimination in public accommodations, credit transactions, employment, and bonding.  The Chicago Fair Housing Ordinance prohibits housing discrimination.  Both ordinances prohibit discrimination based on sexual orientation and/or gender identity.
  4. Houston, TX: Unfortunately, Texas State does not have anti-discrimination legislation that includes sexual orientation or gender identity but there are six cities, not including Houston, in Texas than have their own local ordinances prohibiting discrimination based on sexual orientation and/or gender identity for housing, public accommodations, and employment. Those cities include Austin, Dallas, El Paso, Fort Worth, Plano, and San Antonio, which account for 12% of the Texas population.  Houston does have resources dedicated to service/support to LGBTQ youth, homeless, and elders, and people living with HIV/AIDS.
  5. Philadelphia, PA: Philadelphia is one out of 50 cities in Pennsylvania that have passed local ordinances prohibiting discrimination based on sexual orientation and/or gender identity for housing, public accommodations, and employment whereas Pennsylvania State has not. There are an additional two counties in Pennsylvania that have passed anti-discrimination ordinances including sexual orientation and/or gender identity.  The 50 cities and two counties account for 33% of the Pennsylvania population.
  6. Phoenix, AZ: Arizona State does not have any LGBTQ protection ordinances but there are five cities that have local legislation protecting against discrimination for housing, public accommodations, or employment based on sexual orientation and/or gender identity. Those five cities include Flagstaff, Phoenix, Sedona, Tempe, and Tucson.  These five cities account for 35% of the Arizona population.  Phoenix also has resources dedicated to service/support to LGBTQ youth, homeless, and elders, and people living with HIV/AIDS.
  7. San Antonio, TX: Although Texas State does not have anti-discrimination legislation that includes sexual orientation or gender identity, San Antonio is one of six cities that have their own ordinance that prohibits discrimination based on sexual orientation and/or gender identity in housing and public accommodations. This does not include employment.  San Antonio also has programs that support/service LGBTQ youth and homeless, people living with HIV/AIDS, and the transgender community.  The other cities with local ordinances include Austin, Dallas, El Paso, Fort Worth, and Plano.  These six cities account for 12% of Texas’ population.
  8. San Diego, CA: San Diego is subject to California State law which passed legislation in 1999 that prohibits discrimination based on sexual orientation and in 2004 for gender identity. The City of San Diego, specifically, is committed to furthering fair housing efforts by continuing to address discrimination in their community and supporting education programs regarding the right to equal housing opportunities.
  9. Dallas, TX: Texas State does not have discrimination protection for sexual orientation or gender identity, but Dallas is one of six cities that has their own ordinance that prohibits discrimination based on sexual orientation and/or gender identity in housing, public accommodations, and employment. Dallas also has resources dedicated to services/support for LGBTQ youth and elders and people living with HIV/AIDS.  The other cities with local ordinances include Austin, El Paso, Fort Worth, Plano, and San Antonio.  These six cities account for 12% of Texas’ population.
  10. San Jose, CA: San Jose is subject to California State law which passed legislation that prohibits housing discrimination based on sexual orientation and/or gender identity, in 1999 and 2004 respectively. San Jose is one of the more progressive cities in California as the The San Jose City Council banned discrimination based on sexual orientation in 1979; 20 years ahead of the state law for sexual orientation.
  11. Austin, TX: Although Texas State does not have anti-discrimination legislation that includes sexual orientation or gender identity, Austin is one of six cities that have their own ordinance that prohibits discrimination based on sexual orientation and/or gender identity in housing and public accommodations. This does not include employment.  The other cities with local ordinances include Austin, Dallas, El Paso, Fort Worth, San Antonio, and Plano.  These six cities account for 12% of Texas’ population.
  12. Jacksonville, FL: Jacksonville is one out of 25 cities in Florida that have passed local ordinances prohibiting discrimination based on sexual orientation and/or gender identity in housing, public accommodations, and employment; Florida has not passed these ordinances at the state level. There are an additional 11 counties in Florida that have passed anti-discrimination ordinances including sexual orientation and/or gender identity.  The 25 cities and 11 counties account for 60% of the Florida’s population.
  13. San Francisco, CA: At the state level, California has passed legislation protecting LGBTQ individuals from discrimination against sexual orientation, since 1999, and/or gender identity, since 2004. The City of San Francisco also has its own laws governing against discrimination of additional protected classes which include persons with AIDS, transgenderism, and height and/or weight.
  14. Indianapolis, IN: Indiana has not passed state-level ordinances protecting sexual orientation and/or gender identity, but Indianapolis is one of 15 cities, and three counties, that have passed ordinances at the local level. Indianapolis also has the Indiana Civil Rights Commission for NDO enforcement, non-discrimination against sexual orientation and/or gender identity in city and city contractor employment, and services/support for people living with AIDS/HIV.  The 15 cities and three counties account for 32% of the Indiana’s population.
  15. Columbus, OH: While Ohio has not instated anti-discrimination laws protecting sexual orientation and/or gender identity, Columbus is one of 21 cities in Ohio that has passed protectionist laws at the local level. Columbus ranks as one of the most progressive cities with NDO enforcement by the Columbus Human Rights Commission, a LGBTQ liaison to city executives, an LBGTQ police liaison and/or task force, and openly LGBTQ elected or appointed municipal leaders.  The 22 cities with local ordinances account for 22% of Ohio’s population.
  16. Fort Worth, TX: Fort Worth is one of six cities in Texas that have instated local ordinances that prohibit discrimination against LGBTQ individuals. Texas State does not have these protections.  Fort Worth also has resources dedicated to service/support to LGBTQ youth, homeless, and elders, and people living with HIV/AIDS.  The other cities with local ordinances in Texas include Austin, Dallas, El Paso, Plano, and San Antonio.  These six cities account for 12% of Texas’ population.
  17. Charlotte, NC: North Carolina is one of the few states that explicitly bans cities and counties from passing nondiscrimination provisions related to housing, public accommodations, and employment with 0% of the state population protected against discrimination for sexual orientation or gender identity related to those categories. Charlotte does have nondiscrimination laws against city and city contractor employment regarding sexual orientation and/or gender identity.  They also have NDO enforcement by the Human Relations Commission and they provide services/support to LGBTQ youth and persons with HIV/AIDS.
  18. Seattle, WA: Since 2006, Washington has protected individuals from discrimination against sexual orientation and/or gender identity regarding housing, public accommodations, and employment. Seattle also has The Gender Justice Project which works to advance policy solutions that promote equality related to all-gender restrooms and guidance on gender identity in the workplace.  Their work ensures City of Seattle staff understand how to work with transgender and gender nonconforming individuals.
  19. Denver, CO: Colorado State passed ordinances in 2008 that ensure 100% of the population is protected from discrimination based on sexual orientation and/or gender identity. These ordinances cover housing and commercial space, employment, public accommodations, private education institutions, and private health and welfare services.  The Denver Anti-Discrimination Office (DADO) is one of three municipal offices in Colorado that protects sexual orientation and gender variance.
  20. El Paso, TX: Texas State does not have anti-discrimination legislation that offers protection based on sexual orientation or gender identity. El Paso is one of six cities that have their own ordinance that prohibits discrimination based on sexual orientation and/or gender identity but only in public accommodations. Their legislation does not currently include housing or employment.  The other cities with local ordinances include Austin, Dallas, El Paso, Fort Worth, and Plano.
  21. Detroit, MI: Detroit is one of 41 Michigan cities that have passed local ordinances prohibiting discrimination based on sexual orientation and/or gender identity in housing, public accommodations, and employment. Michigan does not currently have any statewide protections for these categories.  In addition to nondiscrimination laws, Detroit also has NDO enforcement by the Human Rights Commission and provides support/service to people living with HIV/AIDS.  The 41 cities that have local ordinances only account for 22% of Michigan’s total population.
  22. Washington, DC: The District of Columbia amended state legislation in 1977 to cover sexual orientation discrimination for housing, public accommodations, and employment. The legislation was amended again in 2006 to include gender identity.  In 2015, the D. C. City Council approved the Human Rights Amendment Act, which protects LGBTQ students from discrimination.
  23. Boston, MA: Since 1989, Massachusetts state law has protected against discrimination based on sexual orientation. In 2011, nondiscrimination laws were also passed for gender identity and transgender employees of the state government.  Boston was also the first U. S. State to grant marriage licenses to same-sex couples, making it one of the most LBGTQ friendly states in the country.  Boston also allocated resources to assist with NDO enforcement, LGBTQ homeless and elders, and people living with HIV/AIDS.
  24. Memphis, TN: Tennessee currently does not have any nondiscrimination protection based on sexual orientation or gender identity for housing, public accommodations, or employment. The state also has laws preventing passage or enforcement of local nondiscrimination laws making it one of the least LGBTQ friendly states.  Regardless of the state law, the City of Memphis does do all that they can faced with the state law that restricts their ability to pass LGBTQ-inclusive ordinances including nondiscrimination in city employment, a LGBTQ liaison to city executives, and an LGBTQ task force.
  25. Nashville, TN: Tennessee currently does not have any nondiscrimination protection based on sexual orientation or gender identity for housing, public accommodations, or employment. The state also has laws preventing passage or enforcement of local nondiscrimination laws making it one of the least LGBTQ friendly states.  Nashville is the top inclusive city in Tennessee as it has NDO enforcement by the Human Relations Commission and provides services/support to people living with HIV/AIDS.
  26. Portland, OR: Portland is subject to Oregon State law which passed legislation that prohibits housing discrimination on the basis of sexual orientation and/or gender identity in 2007. In addition to a Human Rights Commission, Portland also offers services and support to LBGTQ elders, people living with HIV/AIDS, and the transgender community.
  27. Oklahoma City, OK: Oklahoma State does not currently have any nondiscrimination laws covering sexual orientation or gender identity. In 2016, Oklahoma City passed a protection for housing only based on sexual orientation and/or gender identity.  Only 3% of Oklahoma State’s population is protected against sexual orientation and/or gender identity discrimination.
  28. Las Vegas, NV: Las Vegas is subject to Nevada State law which passed legislation that prohibits housing discrimination based on sexual orientation and/or gender identity in 2011. Although the city does not have a Human Rights Committee, the state has the Nevada Equal Rights Commission.  Las Vegas provides services/support to LGBTQ youth, homeless, and elders, people living with HIV/AIDS, and the transgender community.  Las Vegas has also elected or appointed openly LGBTQ municipal leaders.
  29. Baltimore, MD: Anti-discrimination laws in Maryland for sexual orientation were passed in 2001 and gender identity in 2014. The laws cover housing, public accommodations, and employment.  Baltimore has NDO enforcement by a Human Relations Committee and provides services/support to LGBTQ youth, homeless, and elders, and people living with HIV/AIDS.
  30. Louisville, KY: Kentucky does not have any state-level laws prohibiting the discrimination based on sexual orientation or gender identity, but Louisville is one of eight cities in the state that does prohibit sexual orientation and/or gender identity discrimination for housing, public accommodations, and employment. Louisville does not have any additional services, programs or resources dedicated to the LGBTQ community.  The 8 cities, and two additional counties, account for 27% of Kentucky’s total population.
  31. Milwaukee, WI: Passed in 2018, Wisconsin has antidiscrimination laws that offer protection based on sexual orientation for housing, public accommodations, and employment but that does not include gender identity. Only 5 cities, including Milwaukee, and 3 counties in Wisconsin offer local laws that offer protection against gender identity discrimination for housing and employment, which accounts for 22% of the state’s population.  There is no gender identity discrimination protection for public accommodations in Milwaukee.  Milwaukee also offers NDO enforcement by the Equal Rights Commission and services/support for people living with HIV/AIDS.
  32. Albuquerque, NM: New Mexico has antidiscrimination laws, passed in 2003, covering sexual orientation and/or gender identity for housing, public accommodations, and employment. Albuquerque specifically has the Albuquerque Human Rights Office for NDO enforcement and provides services/support for people living with HIV/AIDS.
  33. Tucson, AZ: Tucson is one of five cities that have instated local ordinances that protect against sexual orientation and/or gender identity for housing. Arizona State does not have any LGBTQ anti-discrimination laws. The additional four cities include Flagstaff, Phoenix, Sedona, and Tempe.  Those five cities account for 35% of the Arizona population.  Tucson also has programs to support LGBTQ youth, homeless, and elders, and people living with HIV/AIDS.
  34. Fresno, CA: Although Fresno is subject to California State law, which prohibits discrimination against sexual orientation and/or gender identity, the city itself is less progressive than other California cities as it does not have any additional councils or programs to assist with the LGBTQ community, persons living with AIDS/HIV, or transgender individuals. California passed legislation in 1999 to protect against discrimination for sexual orientation and again in 2009 for gender identity discrimination.
  35. Sacramento, CA: Sacramento is subject to California State law which passed legislation that prohibits housing discrimination based on sexual orientation and/or gender identity. The City of Sacramento also offers services and support to LBGTQ elders and persons living with AIDS/HIV.  Sacramento has also elected and/or appointed openly LGBTQ municipal leaders.  California passed legislation in 1999 to protect against discrimination for sexual orientation and again in 2009 for gender identity discrimination.
  36. Kansas City, MO: Although Missouri does not have any antidiscrimination laws related to sexual orientation and/or gender identity, Kansas City is one of 12 Missouri cities that have passed local ordinances prohibiting discrimination against sexual orientation and/or gender identity for housing, public accommodations, and employment. Those 12 cities and 2 additional counties account for 35% of the state’s population.  Kansas City also offers services/support to LGBTQ youth, people living with HIV/AIDS, and the transgender community.
  37. Long Beach, CA: Long Beach is subject to California State law which passed legislation that prohibits housing discrimination based on sexual orientation and/or gender identity.  The City of Long Beach also offers services and support to LBGTQ youth and persons living with AIDS/HIV.  Additional benefits from Long Beach include NDO enforcement by the Human Relations Commission, transgender-inclusive healthcare benefits, and non-discrimination in city and city contractor employment.  California passed legislation in 1999 to protect against discrimination for sexual orientation and again in 2009 for gender identity discrimination.
  38. Mesa, AZ: Unfortunately, Arizona State does not have any statewide LGBTQ anti-discrimination laws. Arizona does have five cities that have instated local ordinances that protect LGBTQ individuals for housing. The additional four cities include Flagstaff, Phoenix, Sedona, and Tempe.  Those four cities account for 35% of the Arizona population.  Mesa does not have any additional services, programs or resources dedicated to the LGBTQ community.
  39. Atlanta, GA: There are no housing, public accommodations, or employment nondiscrimination laws in the state of Georgia covering sexual orientation and/or gender identity.  Atlanta, and one other Georgia county, have passed local ordinances that protect against sexual orientation and/or gender identity discrimination for housing, public accommodations, and employment.  Atlanta and Macon-Bibb County account for 6% of the total population of Georgia. Atlanta also has a Human Relations Commission to enforce the NDO as well as elected or appointed openly LGBTQ municipal leaders.
  40. Colorado Springs, CO: Passed in 2008, Colorado State offers statewide protection based on sexual orientation and/or gender identity. While Colorado Springs does not have nearly as many protections or programs as Denver, it is still subject to state nondiscrimination laws.
  41. Virginia Beach, VA: Unfortunately, Virginia State does not have anti-discrimination legislation that includes sexual orientation or gender identity. There are two cities and one county in Virginia than have their own ordinances prohibiting discrimination based on sexual orientation and one city that prohibits discrimination based on gender identity in employment, housing, and/or public accommodations.  The two cities and county are Alexandria, Charlottesville, and Arlington County, which account for 3% of the total Virginia population.
  42. Raleigh, NC: North Carolina is one of the few states that explicitly bans cities and counties from passing nondiscrimination provisions related to housing, public accommodations, and employment with 0% of the state population protected against discrimination for sexual orientation or gender identity related to those categories. Charlotte does have nondiscrimination laws against city and city contractor employment regarding sexual orientation and/or gender identity.  They also have the NC Human Relations Commission and they provide services/support to LGBTQ elders and persons with HIV/AIDS.
  43. Omaha, NE: Although Nebraska does not have any antidiscrimination laws related to sexual orientation or gender identity, Omaha is the only Nebraska city that has passed local ordinances prohibiting discrimination against sexual orientation and/or gender identity for public accommodations and employment. There are no regulations against housing discrimination for sexual orientation and/or gender identity at the state or local level.  Omaha accounts for 22% of the total population in Nebraska.
  44. Miami, FL: Miami is one out of 25 cities in Florida that have passed local ordinances prohibiting discrimination based on sexual orientation and/or gender identity in housing, public accommodations, and employment; Florida has not passed these ordinances at the state level. There are an additional 11 counties in Florida, including Miami-Dade County, that have passed anti-discrimination ordinances including sexual orientation and/or gender identity.  The 25 cities and 11 counties account for 60% of the Florida’s population.
  45. Oakland, CA: At the state level, California has passed legislation protecting LGBTQ individuals from discrimination against sexual orientation in 1999 and/or gender identity in 2004. The City of Oakland also offers services and support to persons living with AIDS/HIV.  Oakland also has anti-discrimination policies based on sexual orientation and/or gender identity in city employment and non-discrimination ordinances against sexual orientation, but not gender identity, for city contractors.
  46. Minneapolis, MN: In 2003, Minnesota passed legislation protecting LGBTQ individuals from discrimination against sexual orientation and/or gender identity for housing, public accommodations, and employment. The City of Minneapolis also the Commission on Civil Rights for NDO enforcement, a LGBTQ liaison to city executives, and an LGBTQ police liaison/task force.
  47. Tulsa, OK: Oklahoma State does not currently have any nondiscrimination laws covering sexual orientation or gender identity. The City of Tulsa has passed a protection for housing only based on sexual orientation and/or gender identity.  Only 3% of Oklahoma State’s population is protected against sexual orientation and/or gender identity discrimination for housing, public accommodations, and employment.
  48. Wichita, KS: At a state level, Kansas does not have any antidiscrimination ordinances based on sexual orientation or gender identity. Kansas has three cities and one county, not including Wichita, that have passed local laws preventing discrimination against sexual orientation and/or gender identity for housing, public accommodations, and employment, which account for 11% of the total Kansas population.
  49. New Orleans, LA: While Louisiana does not have any nondiscrimination ordinances covering sexual orientation or gender identity, New Orleans is one of two cities that have instated local laws for housing, public accommodations, and employment against sexual orientation and/or gender identity discrimination.  New Orleans and Shreveport make up 12% of the total population of Louisiana.
  50. Arlington, TX: Unfortunately, Texas State does not have anti-discrimination legislation that includes sexual orientation or gender identity but there are six cities in Texas than have their own ordinances prohibiting discrimination based on sexual orientation and/or gender identity in employment, housing, and/or public accommodations. Those cities include Austin, Dallas, El Paso, Fort Worth, Plano, and San Antonio, which account for 12% of the Texas population.

The GayRealEstate.com team is committed to ensuring that their clients are connected with agents who will represent their best interests and treat them with respect. The real estate service links clients with trustworthy gay, lesbian and gay-friendly agents who have been interviewed and investigated extensively and maintain equal respect and dedication for all clients.

GayRealEstate.com is dedicated to eliminating the stress and uncertainty of searching for professionals who respect each client’s dignity. Clients are assured that agents will not refuse services or under represent their needs based on sexual orientation or same-sex relationships. Furthermore, agents affiliated with GayRealEstate.com understand the unique needs of LGBT community members and how to best meet them in their local regions.

With more than 25 years of experience as the industry leader, GayRealEstate.com is proud to support the LGBT community and strives to ensure that every real estate transaction is conducted with integrity and without discrimination or intolerance.

 

 

Things Straight Real Estate Agents Might Not Understand

There are many great real estate professionals out there, and chances are any of them will be able to help you find the perfect home. However, there are some things that gay or lesbian real estate professionals will understand right away while straight agents may not. Here are a few things these real estate experts might not grasp right away and why going with an LGBTQ agent might be a better option for you.

They May Not Realize You’re a Couple

Things Straight Real Estate Agents Might Not UnderstandSome straight real estate agents might assume you’ve brought a friend, or worse, your brother/sister, to look at the property with you. They won’t realize you’re looking for a home for the two of you. Correcting them can be a little stressful since you never know how they will react. An LGBTQ agent may ask if you’re together rather than assume you are.

They May Not Look for Family Homes

Another thing a straight real estate agent may do, often unconsciously, is assume that you won’t be starting a family. They may look for smaller homes for the two of you that simply won’t work for children. If you’re planning on starting a family either through adoption or surrogacy, it’s important to let them know upfront that you need a home that will support this. Some may assume that since the two of you can’t biologically have a child together, you’re not planning on a family.

They Sometimes Fall into Stereotypes

While even LGBTQ real estate professionals can do this, it’s more common for straight agents to stereotype gay and lesbian couples. They may assume that lesbian couples want a large shop for their home improvement projects or that gay men want very fashionable houses with a lot of color and extravagant décor. They might show you homes that play into these stereotypes at first, which can be frustrating.

They May Assume You Want to Live in the Gay District

If the city you’re moving to has a gay district, a straight real estate agent might assume that’s where you want to live. You might not have any interest in that area. A good agent, no matter what their orientation, should ask you upfront what part of the city you’re interested in or if there are any particular areas you need to be close to.

Overall, a straight real estate professional may simply make some assumptions. Often, they aren’t actively discriminating against you or purposely doing hurtful things. If you want to avoid any misunderstandings, though, working with a gay or lesbian agent will help you get your housing search off on the right foot.

Gayborhood Prices Are Increasing

It shouldn’t come as a surprise to anyone that housing costs in many gay villages are higher than average. Gay and lesbian real estate experts in San Francisco, New York, and Chicago can all tell you that the popular gayborhoods in these three cities are expensive. But just how expensive are they, and how have the prices changed? A survey done by real estate website Trulia and dating site OKCupid reveals that home value premiums jumped in just five years (between 2012 and 2017).

New York Prices Increased the most

Gayborhood Prices Are IncreasingThe survey looked at the average home value per square foot in the gayborhood and in the zip code overall in order to determine what percentage the value increase. For example, in New York in 2012, the gay neighborhood’s home value was, on average, 106% of the entire zip code’s average home value. By 2017, however, the gayborhood’s average home value was 162% of the home value in the rest of that area. That’s a fairly substantial increase in just five years.

In terms of cost per square foot, that means home values in the New York gay neighborhoods increased from $436/square foot in 2012 to $659/square foot in 2017. For those who purchased real estate in the area, the investment paid off. For those who are looking to move into New York’s gay neighborhoods, though, it’s going to be costlier.

Which Other Cities Saw Increases?

Only one other city’s gay neighborhoods increased by more than 50%. While most people would expect to see San Francisco or LA here, neither of those cities made the top ten. Instead, the city in the number two spot is New Orleans. The Louisiana city known for Mardi Gras saw gay neighborhood housing prices jump from $193/square foot to $290/square foot, an average increase of almost $100. Boston come in third with an overall jump from $361/square foot to $557/square foot, moving from 79% of the average zip code cost to 105%.

Some Gayborhood Home Values Declined

Some gayborhood home prices actually dropped, becoming closer to the average home cost in the zip code. In Miami, Florida, gay neighborhood values went from 73% of the zip code premium to 60%, though value per square foot still increased from $188 to $296 due to overall market increases. In San Francisco, the home value premium dropped from 17% more than the average to only 12% above average, bringing homes in the Castro district more in line with what you’d pay anywhere else in the city.

Capitol Hill – Denver’s Gay Ghetto

When most people think about gay neighborhoods, many think of sunny California or busy New York City. Few people would name Colorado as a gay-friendly state, but Denver actually has a very active LGBTQ community. The Mile High City is home to a great gay neighborhood called Capitol Hill. This part of the city is not only the focal point of Denver’s LGBTQ community, but is also a major epicenter for artists and musicians, especially those in the alternative punk genre.

Defining the Neighborhood

Capitol Hill – Denver’s Gay GhettoCapitol Hill is almost a perfect square. To the north is Colfax Avenue/Highway 70. Its southern border is Seventh Avenue, while the east and west sides of the neighborhood are defined by Downing Street and Broadway respectively. Some people define Capitol Hill to also include the neighboring Cheesman Park, but the city officially defines that area as its own neighborhood. There’s also a North Capitol Hill that sits above Colfax Avenue, but it’s more often called Uptown.

It’s Got Everything from Sun Rise to Sun Set

You can start your morning in Capitol Hill by getting coffee at one of the trendy little cafes that dot the neighborhood. Then it’s off for some light morning shopping at one of the boutiques before lunch. During the evening, there are a number of concert venues and bars where you can party the night away. Cheesman Park and nearby Civic Center Park may not fall within the neighborhood, but they’re not far, and both hold a number of different festivals. Several clubs in the area cater to the LGBTQ community, of course.

A Neighborhood in Gentrification

While it’s something of a stereotype to say that all LGBTQ neighborhoods go through gentrification, it is true of Capitol Hill and, in fact, most of central Denver. Many of the historic homes in Capitol Hill are large and fairly elaborate. That’s because the area was originally home to some of Denver’s high society families. Following the 1893 Silver Crash, however, some of these homes were demolished and cheaper apartments were built. Capitol Hill was then solidly middle class until the 1950s, when it became a fairly poor area.

Since then, Capitol Hill has slowly been rebuilding. The gentrification effects peaked in the mid-2000s, and today, those cheap apartments have been replaced with luxury condos. Despite this, some of the older housing is still quite affordable. On average, Capitol Hill isn’t as expensive as some of the other neighborhoods. One of the local gay or lesbian real estate agents can help you find a home in this area that fits your budget.

CEO’s Vision Leads GayRealEstate.com

GayRealEstate.com has been around for over 25 years! We wanted to share a little bit with you about how the company was started – from the CEO himself, Jeff Hammerberg. We did a quick interview with him so you can get to know him and see how his personal experience leads the vision of our company!

Founding CEO of GayRealEstate.com

Jeff Hammerberg, Founding CEO of GayRealEstate.com

What do you love about your job?

I have the amazing opportunity to align fellow members of the LGBTQ community with a top gay / gay friendly realtor in any city in the United States or Canada. Many of these agents I’ve known and have worked with for over 25 years! It’s very gratifying for me to know that a client’s best interests will be fully and legally represented by a full-time professional realtor that stands in full support of our LGBTQ community.

 

What led you to start this company?

In the early 1990’s, I witnessed an instance of “quiet homophobia” while working at a Re/Max office. A gay male couple stepped into the ReMax Professionals office in Littleton, CO interested in buying a home and were assisted by the floor agent. A floor agent is an “on-duty” agent that handles all of the incoming calls and walk-in traffic – an opportunity to pick up new clients.

On this particular day, the floor agent was a straight friend of mine; honest, nice and kind, but someone who had probably never met an openly gay person. After he consulted with the couple, and they left, the agent took a lot of ribbing in the back room from fellow agents that had witnessed the interaction. It was shocking what I witnessed.

While the agent went on to sell these guys a home, I questioned how well they were represented. Were these clients’ best interests being represented? Was there a better way to ensure members of the LGBTQ community could be assured of fair, equal and honest representation by someone that understood the unique needs and desires of our community?

I realized in that moment, that by creating a database of gay, lesbian, and gay-friendly realtors, I could help other LGBTQ individuals and couples avoid discomfort, uncertainty, unenthusiastic representation or even hostility.

Individuals could be assured of a comfortable, smooth buying or selling experience while being fully represented.

So I created what today is known as GayRealEstate.com

 

Why is what this company does so important?

Listen, this is potentially the largest investment you’ll make in your lifetime. It’s not only important to know exactly where your realtor stands in reference to their acceptance and support of the LGBTQ community – it’s equally important to know the very large commission they will earn is not partially going to support a church, or political candidate or party that is not standing in full support of our LGBTQ community. Where we spend our dollars is of huge importance, especially in this day and age.

 

What sets Gay Real Estate (GRE) apart?

We’ve been representing members of our LGBTQ community for over 25 years!

In that time we’ve not only continued to build our business and systems and processes, to ensure they are cutting edge and seamless for our potential clients, we’ve given back to our community! We annually support dozens and dozens of organizations and individuals that continue to fight for our freedom and rights. We recognize this is as important a commitment today as it was back in the early 90’s when we first started.

 

What life experience has most influenced your career?

I was brought up in a “born again” family in Northern Minnesota – I dated women into my late 20’s and came to terms with my sexuality at age 30. My mother’s first comment when I came out to her was “you’re going to hell, you know that, don’t you?”

I guess I spent a great deal of my life exceeding at everything I did, and often that was to “make up for being gay”… that’s a tough way to spend half your life, but I know it’s not unique to me, and I also know it’s been part of my perfect path.

I learned early on in the US Navy that life would give back to me, what I gave to it. I’ve learned that each day if I take even the tiniest step in the direction of the life I’d like to have – it unfolds perfectly! I’m always taking action, and I’ve always been willing to work harder than anyone else would expect of me.

 

If you weren’t running this (and other) companies – what would you be doing?

It’s a good question. I have this HUGE entrepreneurial spirit – I’ve always got my hands in something! What business idea do you have? Lol! At a younger age I thought about motivation speaking – I’ve been a junkie of motivation since my childhood, where my dad had me listening to Earl Nightingale, Robert Schuller and others. I like coaching (I’m a Certified Professional Coach, CPC ®), mentoring and brainstorming.

The most gratifying for me, and I believe the biggest contribution I can make to society, is volunteering. I currently volunteer through SAGE, visiting elderly members of our LGBTQ community that leave their homes, transitioning into senior living facilities, retirement homes and assisted living. A large majority of them go back into the closet, a potentially very difficult, confusing and depressing readjustment in life.

 

What is a fun fact about you?

After 27 years in Denver, CO my husband and I are moving full-time to Palm Springs, CA. We’ve been visiting Palm Springs for a number of years, spending a couple of months during the Colorado winters. We’ve finally decided to make it full time.

If you haven’t been, I’d recommend a visit! Palm Springs has a wonderful pace of life. Amazing theatre, amazing restaurants, amazing hiking, amazing pool parties, and just 1.5 hrs. to Los Angeles. The Palm Springs community is 40% LGBTQ, and the ENTIRE city council and mayor are LGBTQ, it’s just comfortable… and where else could you live, where Leonardo DiCaprio, Barry Manilow and Suzanne Summers are your neighbors!

Posted on July 17, 2018 in Gay Real Estate News, Gay Realtor News, Gay Realtors

Cities You May Not Realize are LGBTQ Friendly

Everyone knows that New York, San Francisco, and Chicago are very LGBTQ-friendly and have well-known gay neighborhoods. But there are a number of other cities out there that you might not know are very friendly to the LGBTQ community. These smaller cities don’t make huge headlines for having gay neighborhoods, but they do. If you speak to a gay or lesbian real estate expert in one of these cities, they would tell you that their LGBTQ community is thriving. Here are a few of these cities.

Missoula

Cities You May Not Realize are LGBTQ FriendlyYou’ve probably never heard of this little city in Montana, which isn’t surprising at all. It’s the home of the University of Montana, a liberal arts university that brings in a good number of young people to the city. Missoula also features the Western Montana LGBT Community Center and a number of gay bars and other businesses. If you love the outdoors, you’ll enjoy the national parks that surround the area.

Anchorage

One of the bigger cities in Alaska, Anchorage is home to a thriving LGBTQ community. The city also ranked highly on the HRC Municipal Equality Index with an 85 out of a possible 100. That shows that the city itself has a number of inclusive policies and is LGBTQ-friendly. Anchorage hosts Alaska’s Pride every year and is home to several LGBTQ support groups. If you love the colder temperatures and don’t mind the ice and snow, Anchorage may be the winter wonderland you’ve always wanted.

Bloomington

While Chicago may be the midland LGBTQ paradise, it may not be for everyone. If Chicago is too large for you, you might take a look at Bloomington, Indiana. This smaller city scored a perfect 100 on the HRC index. Like Missoula, Bloomington is a college town, so you can expect its average age to skew younger than many other cities. The city is home to a great number of LGBTQ-owned businesses, restaurants, and bars. Bloomington also hosts the Pride Film Festival, an event that has run for more than a dozen years.

These three cities are just a few of the most unexpected LGBTQ friendly cities in the country. They’re great examples of places where the LGBTQ community not only exists, but also thrives even though they’re not that well-known. If you’d like to know more about what it’s like to live in Bloomington, Missoula, or Anchorage, contact a gay or lesbian real estate professional in that city.

A Brief History of Pride Month

Many people know June is LGBTQ pride month, but few people really understand what exactly that means. Why was June picked, and is there any special significance to pride other than showing off your love of the LGBTQ community?

Pre-Pride Events

A Brief History of Pride MonthPrior to the creation of Pride Month, there were a number of different movements and activities. The first pride parades were held in June in 1970 on the anniversary of the famous Stonewall Riots. These marches were held in New York, Los Angeles, San Francisco, and Chicago. They weren’t called pride parades or pride festivals, and they were much more serious than many of today’s events. Marking the anniversary of Stonewall soon became a widespread event. In 1971, there were many more events across the U.S. and even in London, Paris, and Stockholm. The number of marches continued to grow every year after that.

The Transition to the Modern Day Pride Event

Up until the early 1980s, pride marches were mostly focused on increasing the visibility and awareness of the LGBTQ community and the discrimination the community faced. However, around the turn of the decade, these events were slowly changed from commemorative marches to the, pride type festival that we know today. They became more organized by groups that weren’t as radical and were looking to create a positive, inclusive event.

The Creation of Pride Month

However, the Stonewall Riots were still recognized as the root of what Pride festivals were all about. Since many of these festivals were held on or near the anniversary of Stonewall, June naturally became the month associated with LGBTQ pride. While these events were held through the 1980s and early 90s, it wasn’t until 1999 that June was officially declared “Gay & Lesbian Pride Month” by President Bill Clinton. However, it’s important to note that only two presidents have officially named June as pride month. President Clinton did so in 1999 and 2000, and President Obama officially declared the month “LGBT Pride Month” In 2010 through 2016.

What Does Pride Mean?

Pride is more than just an excuse to through a street party or ride on a float. It’s a celebration of LGBTQ culture and a way of recognizing and honoring the struggles the community has faced. While same-sex marriage might be legal now, LGBTQ individuals and couples still face challenges with discrimination in employment, housing, and much more.

Are you ready to show your pride this month? The gay and lesbian real estate professionals here at GayRealEstate.com are!

Posted on June 30, 2018 in Gay and Lesbian, Gay Marriage

Provincetown – The Gayest City in America

Data gathered by the U.S. Census Bureau declared Provincetown, Massachusetts, to be the Gayest City in America in 2011. Most people weren’t that surprised when the 2010 census data showed that more same-sex couples lived in P-Town than anywhere else in the U.S. Overall, the data showed that there were 163 same-sex couples for every 1,000 households in the city. Even though this information comes from the last major census in 2010, anyone who lives in or visits Provincetown can see that things haven’t really changed that much.

A Great Place to Live and Work

Provincetown – The Gayest City in AmericaProvincetown is only home to around 3,000 people, but its summer population can hit 20 times that. It’s a major tourist location thanks to its beaches, artist community, and LGBTQ-friendliness. With its location on the very tip of Cape Cod, Provincetown entices people from around the world to spend at least a few weeks here during the summer. It’s relaxed, even when all of the tourists are in town, making it a great place to escape to and recharge.

Of course, if you’re living here, you may feel like you’re being invaded in the summer. It can seem more crowded than you’d like, but as a local, you’ll know where to go to escape the tourists. You also have the advantage in being on your home turf!

The History of Provincetown and the LGBTQ Community

Provincetown really started to grow in the 1960s. It attracted a good number of hippies thanks to its rural charm, cheap property, and gorgeous waters. While it was already attracting some vacationers, it wasn’t a major tourist destination yet.

In the 1970s, the secret of Provincetown reached the LGBTQ community, and many started moving into the area to both visit and to look for homes. While there had been a higher than average gay and lesbian presence in the town for years, it wasn’t until the 1970s that it really became an LGBTQ tourist destination. In fact, the Provincetown Business Guild was actually created in order to bring in more LGBTQ tourism! Today, the guild has over 200 businesses.

Provincetown Today

If you’re thinking about moving to P-town, you’ll need to have a nice budget. Gay and lesbian real estate agents point out a cheap condo is still $350,000 or more, while a single-family home starts at half a million. If you want beachfront property, be ready to pay in the millions.

The LGBTQ Community and Adoption in 2018

Many LGBTQ individuals and couples plan on someday having a family. For a number of these couples, that means adoption. Even for two same-sex female couples who have a child through artificial insemination, the non-birth mother should still legally adopt the child to make certain her rights are not questioned at any point. This is usually done through what’s legally called a second parent adoption. This allows a co-parent to share legal rights with the other parent, regardless of their marital status. If you’re thinking about moving to another state, you need to understand the adoption laws in that state before you make your home there.

Challenges to LGBTQ Adoption

The LGBTQ Community and Adoption in 2018

The LGBTQ Community and Adoption in 2018

Unfortunately, LGBTQ adoption rights have been challenged in a number of states. There has yet to be a court case similar to Obergefell v. Hodges to establish a federal decision on same-sex couples and adoption. This means that each state can pass its own laws regarding adoption and LGBTQ couples. In some states, laws have been passed protecting the right of all people, regardless or orientation, to adopt. In other cases, states have refused to pass any sort of non-discrimination law or have even actively worked to take away the rights of LGBTQ couples to adopt.

Where Your Rights Are Protected

If you’re ready to start a family, here are the states that offer protections based on both orientation and gender identity:

  • Washington
  • Oregon
  • California
  • New Mexico
  • Iowa
  • New York
  • New Jersey
  • Rhode Island
  • Connecticut

There are a few states that have protections based or sexual orientation, but not gender identity. They include Montana, Arizona, Michigan, and Virginia. Virginia, however, has recently passed laws that allow adoption agencies to refuse to place children with same-sex couples, walking back those protections.

Challenges to Adoption

There are a number of states that have worked to prevent same-sex couples from adopting. Nebraska, for example, has often used what some have said is the state’s policy regarding two unrelated adults from adopting children to deny LGBTQ couples. Others have challenged this policy, saying that it has only been applied to same-sex couples. No firm decision has been made in this case as of 2018. Alabama, Michigan, Texas, Mississippi, North Dakota, and South Dakota have passed laws allowing adoption agencies to claim “religion exemptions” for allowing same-sex couples from adopting.

Recently, Colorado, Kansas, and Oklahoma legislatures have also considered bills that have been introduced as “child welfare” laws. Despite the name, these laws aren’t really aimed at improving child welfare. Instead, they focus on restricting same-sex couples from adopting. In Oklahoma, the bill was passed and signed into law by Governor Fallen on May 11, 2018.

While the laws are always in flux, currently these are states that LGBTQ couples may wish to avoid if they’re considering adopting. You can always ask your gay or lesbian real estate agent to point you towards resources regarding adoption in the state you’re planning on moving to.

Posted on June 11, 2018 in Fair Housing Laws, Gay and Lesbian, Gay Marriage

Building Your LGBTQ Road Trip Bucket List

There are a number of places around the U.S. that played a key part in getting the LGBTQ community to where it is today. Some people like to visit these historic sites to learn more about what part they played in LGBTQ history, while others enjoy the welcoming atmosphere and openness. You might even love one of these areas so much that you want to move there! While some are fairly well-known, others may not immediately come to mind when you think about places to visit with LGBTQ history. Here are a few places that need to be on your road trip bucket list.

San Francisco

Building Your LGBTQ Road Trip Bucket ListOf course the number one spot on just about every LGBTQ road trip list is San Francisco. Widely regarded as the Mecca for members of the community, people come from around the world to visit the Castro district and experience San Francisco’s annual pride festival. It’s definitely a place to visit at least once. If you’re thinking about moving to the Bay Area, consider the suburbs. Buying in San Francisco itself will cost you a good amount, but the areas surrounding the city itself are much more affordable. The BART rail system can get you just about anywhere, so commuting isn’t a problem.

Boystown

The Chicago neighborhood of Boystown is notable for being the first gayborhood in the country. This relaxed area may not seem that important to the LGBTQ movement at first glance, but many of the homes and businesses here have been owned by or catered to the LGBTQ community for decades.

Greenwich Village

All of New York City could be on your LGBTQ road trip bucket list, of course, but the Manhattan neighborhood of Greenwich Village definitely needs to be on the itinerary. It’s the home of the Stonewall Inn, the location of the famous Stonewall riots that took place in June of 1969. This event was one of—if not the most—important event that started the modern LGBTQ movement for equal rights. Visitors can learn more about the riots at the Stonewall National Monument.

Go to a Large Pride Festival

Most large cities around the country hold annual pride events. If you’ve never been to one before, it’s time to change that! These festivals are a great place to meet new friends, experience unique events, and have a lot of fun. Just being in a place where you know you’re accepted by everyone around you can be a life-changing, or at least life-affirming, event.